Academic Databases

What are they?

Both Falmouth and Exeter subscribe to a wide range of online databases. These are large directories of content such as articles, images, market trend reports and scientific papers. These directories can be used to locate useful journal articles for your essays simply by typing in a name or some keywords that describe your topic. In many cases these articles will be available to view online, if not it may be possible to source a copy either on our shelves or from another library.

All databases will either provide links to the whole article for you to read and print it out, or will provide enough detail for you to be able to find it in the library or elsewhere.

University of Exeter students might prefer to use their Using Electronic Resources LibGuide and E-Resources Help LibGuide

 

Why use them?

 

What Are Databases and Why You Need Them

Remote video URL

 

Using Library databases will save you time and effort compared to searching individual journals or wading through web search results. You should also use academic databases rather than Google or Wikipedia because the information included in the databases will be of a high academic quality.

 

Finding a relevant database

Falmouth

All Library databases available to Falmouth University students are covered in a e-resource list on the Library website. You may prefer to use the Specialist Databases section of your Subject Guides to discover the databases that your Academic Liaison Librarian recommends.

You can also use Library Search, which enables you to search multiple databases from a single search box. Library Search can be a good place to start your search. Be aware though that not every database is searchable via Library Search. The databases that are not searchable include Box of Broadcasts, some of our trends databases and business databases. You can find out more about Library Search by visiting our playlist of support videos.

Exeter

Electronic resources available to University of Exeter students are in a Databases A-Z list, and can be filtered further by Subject. You can also use your Subject LibGuide, which pulls together not only the recommended databases for your subject but also provides useful library links and study skills advice. The Geography LibGuide is a typical example.

You can also use Library Search, which enables you to search multiple databases from a single search box. This can be a good place to start your search. If you'd like to know more about using Library Search, try Library Search: What is it? How do I use it?